Civil War Classes

Course Offering

The Civil War comes to life with diversified and specialized courses which delve more deeply into historical accounts from this period of time than the average history class. Learn about more than just names, dates and events with our certified and well-versed instructors who are all members of the Delaware Valley Civil War Round Table.

Visit the Library for links and resources regarding the Civil War.

Let the Civil War Come To You!

Courses and/or presentations can be scheduled for your organization, at any time, at YOUR location.

 

Prisons and Prisoners
They were called Portals of Hell and more than 56,000 men died in them during the Civil War.  Andersonville was merely the best known of many nightmarish death traps – North and South.  This course shows the horrendous conditions of these prisons, and recounts the many daring escape attempts, some of which succeeded.
DATES: Thursdays, June 5, 12 & 19
TIME: 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
FEE: $79
INSTRUCTOR: Hugh Boyle

To register: call (215) 884-2218 or click here to register online with a credit card.

The Sioux Uprising of 1862
In the summer of 1862, Indian warfare in Minnesota left 400-800 soldiers and settlers dead, provoking military action against the Dakota Sioux.  When it was over, a military commission convicted 303 Sioux warriors of rape, murder and other atrocities, and sentenced them to death.  President Lincoln commuted all but 38 of those sentences, but it was still the largest mass execution in U.S. history.
DATES: Thursdays, July 31, August 7 & 14
TIME: 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
FEE: $79
INSTRUCTOR: Steve Wright

To register: call (215) 884-2218 or click here to register online with a credit card.

 

Railroad in the Civil War
Napoleon may have said that an army travels on its stomach, but Civil War armies traveled by rail – changing the face of warfare forever.  Railroads were the key to victory in many battles, including Bull Run and Chickamauga, and were favorite targets for cavalry raids.  Cities like Chattanooga, Corinth, Atlanta and Petersburg became strategically vital because of the railroads.
DATES: Mondays, June 16, 23 & 30
TIME: 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
FEE: $79
INSTRUCTOR: Matt Bruce

To register: call (215) 884-2218 or click here to register online with a credit card.

Civil War Institute Classes for Fall 2014

City Life in the Civil War
Some American cities were physically devastated by the Civil War, while others barely heard a shot fired in anger.  But whether the battles were near or far, the war had a major impact.  This class explores how life changed radically in six Northern and Southern cities – Baltimore, New Orleans, New York, Philadelphia, Richmond, and Washington.
Six instructors.  Thursdays, Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25; Oct. 2, 9.  $150.
6:30 – 8:30 pm
Room 41

To register: call (215) 884-2218 or click here to register online with a credit card.

Small Conflicts: Large Consequences – NEW
Most Civil War battles were actually quite small, and most people have probably never heard of them.  But small conflicts can have large consequences and change strategic realities.  This course focuses on the more compelling lesser battles and includes many climactic battles that had a direct impact on the war’s outcome.
Herb Kaufman, instructor.  Mondays, Sept 8, 15, 22.  $79.
6:30 – 8:30 pm
Room 13

To register: call (215) 884-2218 or click here to register online with a credit card.

 

Life of the Common Soldier
Who served in the armies of the Blue and the Gray?  What were their living conditions?  What were their thoughts as they marched into battle?  This class describes the soldier’s life, which has been described as “weeks of utter boredom, interrupted by moments of sheer terror.”
Herb Kaufman, instructor.  Wednesdays, Oct. 15, 22, 29; Nov. 5, 12, 19.   $150.
6:30 – 8:30 pm
Room TBD

To register: call (215) 884-2218 or click here to register online with a credit card.

 

Petersburg, the Final Year of the War – NEW
The Petersburg Campaign extended nearly a year – from June 1864 to April 1865.  It has been called a siege, but it was really a campaign of movement around Richmond, extending from Cold Harbor to Saylor’s Creek, leading ultimately to Robert E. Lee’s surrender to U.S. Grant at Appomattox Court House less than a week after the Saylor’s Creek engagement.
Matt Bruce, instructor.  Mondays, Oct. 20, 27; Nov. 3.  $79.
6:30 – 8:30 pm
Room 13

To register: call (215) 884-2218 or click here to register online with a credit card.

 

The Election of 1864 – NEW
Many believed a presidential election in the midst of a war was irresponsible and that a successful one would be a miracle.  Abraham Lincoln did not think so, and he had the most to lose.  Would Lincoln even get his party’s nomination, and if he did, would he have a chance of gaining a second term? The fate of America would hang on the answer.
Hugh Boyle, instructor.  Thursdays, Nov. 6, 13, 20.  $79.
6:30 – 8:30 pm
Room 41
To register: call (215) 884-2218 or click here to register online with a credit card.

 

Death of an Army: The Franklin-Nashville Campaign
When William T. Sherman marched from Atlanta to the sea in November 1864, his recent opponent, John Bell Hood, marched in the opposite direction.  Hood’s quixotic scheme to recapture Tennessee ended tragically for his army – which was gutted at Franklin, where six Confederate generals died, and disintegrated at Nashville.
Jerry Carrier, instructor. Mondays, Nov. 17, 24; Dec. 1.  $79.
6:30 – 8:30 pm
Room 13
To register: call (215) 884-2218 or click here to register online with a credit card.